The Battle of Brunanburh is Done

With all the illness hereabouts — I was struck down with the norovirus after all — and quite a bit of backlogged grading to slog through, I’m rather tardy in relaying the fact that the Brunanburh Casebook is out of my hands. The book clocked in at over 440 pages without the endmatter, so it’s a big one. I’m enormously pleased that its yet another step closer to bookshelves, and I’m sure my wonderful team of fellow contributors feels the same. I really do think the book will do much to encourage fresh study of a battle that shaped much of the subsequent history of the British Isles. I’m crossing my fingers for an honorary knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II.

I’ve not seen any of it yet due to the aforementioned illnesses and what-not, but in another day or two I’m suddenly going to be wondering what the heck I should do with all the time I’m no longer spending on a tenth-century battle!

6 Comments

  1. Sir, I have three words… The Gathering Storm.

  2. Congratulations, sir! And regarding that “free time,” I believe we’ve discussed this previously, yes?

  3. Michael Deakin

    It will make a welcome distraction!
    I’ve spent the past 6 weeks delving into the possibilities of a Humber landing – a la John of Worcester.
    Since I got sucked into this Brunanburh vortex, Ive learned so much about the early medieval history of this beautiful island of ours, as well as a large dose of continental history also !!

  4. Delve away, Michael!

    The more eyes on this forgotten corner of history, the better — even if our eyes don’t always see the same things.

  5. Michael Deakin

    Hello again Michael


    ding v. knock, strike; batter, beat down; defeat

    from Old Norse dengja

    Is it possible that Dingesmere was named after the event ?

    ie – Wetland of the defeated / beaten ?

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